Category Archives: Olney-Hooker Family

The Olneys are an early American family with roots in New England, where they helped found Rhode Island. Four of their ancestors arrived on the Mayflower, and several of their ancestors can be traced far back into English history. They married into the Slack or Sleght family, which I am in the early stages of researching, but which looks to be a family descended from the earliest Dutch settlers in New Amsterdam, Kingston and Long Island who moved on to New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Associated family names include: Dexter, Scott, Jenckes, Coggeshall, Whipple, Peck, Bosworth, Howland, Tilley, Slack and Stock.

The Hooker and associated families of Prescott, Moore, Scott, Kathan, Taylor, Boardman, Allis, Richardson, Woodruff, Winchell, Fairbanks, and Bellows, amongst others, were early settler in Massachusetts and Connecticut, the earliest probably arriving in 1632. Succeeding generations moved to western Massachusetts, then Vermont, and later New York, and westward.

Four direct ancestors fought in the American army during the Revolution, and one was a ranger on the frontier, defending the settlements from Indian attacks: Major Coggeshall Olney of Rhode Island; Lieutenant Daniel Boardman of Massachusetts; Corporal George Taylor of Connecticut; Private and later militiaman, Israel Scott Hooker of Massachusetts; and Ralph Slack in Pennsylvania. Many of their siblings also played large and small roles in the Revolution.

Earl William IV de Warenne, d. 1240, An Intelligent Man with a Strong Personality

lost-letters-of-medieval-lifeGenealogy at its most basic, and to me most boring, is simply a search for and listing of the names and dates of our ancestors.  Finding those names is precious, don’t get me wrong, but finding a way to turn those names into personalities through historical associations, anecdotes, photos, portraits, copies of original documents – that is precious.

When researching quite early ancestors, there is usually no opportunity to get a glimpse of the person behind the name.  That’s what makes the publication of some potential personal letters by William IV de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, such a find.

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Will and Family of William Merbury (Marburie/Marbury), Gent., 1581

Header on the first page of William Merbury's wll

Header on the first page of William Merbury’s wll

William Marbury or Merbury or Merburie, Gentleman, was born about 1524, son of Robert Marbury and Katherine Williamson.  Robert served as yeoman to King Henry VIII’s grandmother in 1509, and in 1517, he was appointed to be serjeant at arms in the Royal Household.  Robert and Katherine only had one known/living child, William, before Katherine died.  Robert later remarried to Agnes Wodfurth(?).  William was the only child listed in Robert’s will dated 28 Jul 1545.  Robert left lands and tenements in Lincolnshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire.

William attended Pembroke College at Cambridge University, matriculating at Easter in 1544.  He married Agnes, daughter of John Lenton or Linton about 1545; the couple had nine known children.  In May 1551, he was admitted to the Middle Temple and practiced law for many years.  He was elected a Member of Parliament in 1572 and 1576.  He wrote his will on 22 Jan 1577, and he was buried in May 1581 in Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.

Two of William’s children had connections with colonial America.  His son, the Reverend Francis Marbury, had two daughters who emigrated with their husbands, and his daughter, Katherine, had at least one son who emigrated.

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Eleazer Olney – 1803 Petition to Congress for “relief as a British refugee”

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p1

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p1

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p2

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p2

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p 3

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

While doing broad searches on my Olney family members recently, I happened to search for Eleazer Olney on the Library of Congress website, in the ‘American Memory’ section under Government and Law (don’t ask, no idea why) – and I discovered a little gem:

“Journal of the Senate of the United States of America, 1789-1873
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1803.

…Mr. Worthington presented the petition of Eleazer Olney, of Marietta, late a resident in the province of Nova Scotia, praying to be entitled to the benefits of the “Act for the relief of the refugees from the British provinces of Canada and Nova Scotia,” for reasons stated in the petition; and the petition was read.

Ordered, That it be referred to the committee appointed on the 27th of October last to consider the petition of Martha Seamans and others, to report thereon to the Senate.”

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Family & Will of Stephen Agard, Esq. (~1513-~1563) of Broughton, Northamptonshire (Rev 11/16)

Stephen Agard Will page 1

Stephen Agard Will page 1

 

 

 

 

 

Stephen Agard, Esq. of Broughton, Northamptonshire, was born about 1513 and died shortly before 13 Oct 1562, when he was buried in Broughton.  He was probably the second born surviving son of George Agard (~1486? – 1522) and his wife, Elizabeth Middlemore (~1487? – ?).  The family consisted of three surviving children that I know of:  eldest son John, Stephen, and, I would argue, their sister, Katherine.  As Stephen held Broughton by 1546, I am guessing that John died young without surviving heirs.

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George Agard, William Boughton, a Court Case & a Muddy Ancestry (Revised post)

George Agard, William Boughton court case document

George Agard, William Boughton court case document

 

 

 

 

Agard Boughton Court Case Transcription Rev 1

This post focuses on the pedigree of the Sutton-Malory-Boughton-Allesley-Agard family detailed in the legal document above (Available from UK National Archives: reference C 1/1495/7, Boughton v Malory), which was provided by George Agard and William Boughton in support of their lawsuit against Joan Malory in about 1495/1510.

First, I will explain what I understand of the pedigree, and secondly, I will explain what I think the actual pedigree is; I don’t think they are exactly the same.

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