Author Archives: kellymkg

Emigrants from Insel Pellworm, Nordfriesland: A List

Pellworm MapPellworm is an island off the west coast of what is now Germany.  In centuries past, it was part of the Duchy of Schlesvig, at times ruled by Prussia, at times ruled by Denmark.

In the 2nd half of the 19th century, as in many places in Europe, over-population, lack of opportunity and the wish to avoid forced military service drove hundreds of Pellwormers, individuals and families, to emigrate.  Most went to the United States, though some also left for Australia and South America.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Earl William IV de Warenne, d. 1240, An Intelligent Man with a Strong Personality

lost-letters-of-medieval-lifeGenealogy at its most basic, and to me most boring, is simply a search for and listing of the names and dates of our ancestors.  Finding those names is precious, don’t get me wrong, but finding a way to turn those names into personalities through historical associations, anecdotes, photos, portraits, copies of original documents – that is precious.

When researching quite early ancestors, there is usually no opportunity to get a glimpse of the person behind the name.  That’s what makes the publication of some potential personal letters by William IV de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey, such a find.

Continue reading

Will and Family of William Merbury (Marburie/Marbury), Gent., 1581

Header on the first page of William Merbury's wll

Header on the first page of William Merbury’s wll

William Marbury or Merbury or Merburie, Gentleman, was born about 1524, son of Robert Marbury and Katherine Williamson.  Robert served as yeoman to King Henry VIII’s grandmother in 1509, and in 1517, he was appointed to be serjeant at arms in the Royal Household.  Robert and Katherine only had one known/living child, William, before Katherine died.  Robert later remarried to Agnes Wodfurth(?).  William was the only child listed in Robert’s will dated 28 Jul 1545.  Robert left lands and tenements in Lincolnshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire.

William attended Pembroke College at Cambridge University, matriculating at Easter in 1544.  He married Agnes, daughter of John Lenton or Linton about 1545; the couple had nine known children.  In May 1551, he was admitted to the Middle Temple and practiced law for many years.  He was elected a Member of Parliament in 1572 and 1576.  He wrote his will on 22 Jan 1577, and he was buried in May 1581 in Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England.

Two of William’s children had connections with colonial America.  His son, the Reverend Francis Marbury, had two daughters who emigrated with their husbands, and his daughter, Katherine, had at least one son who emigrated.

Continue reading

Eleazer Olney – 1803 Petition to Congress for “relief as a British refugee”

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p1

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p1

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p2

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p2

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p 3

Eleazer Olney Refugee Petition p 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

While doing broad searches on my Olney family members recently, I happened to search for Eleazer Olney on the Library of Congress website, in the ‘American Memory’ section under Government and Law (don’t ask, no idea why) – and I discovered a little gem:

“Journal of the Senate of the United States of America, 1789-1873
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1803.

…Mr. Worthington presented the petition of Eleazer Olney, of Marietta, late a resident in the province of Nova Scotia, praying to be entitled to the benefits of the “Act for the relief of the refugees from the British provinces of Canada and Nova Scotia,” for reasons stated in the petition; and the petition was read.

Ordered, That it be referred to the committee appointed on the 27th of October last to consider the petition of Martha Seamans and others, to report thereon to the Senate.”

Continue reading

Nels & Ane Jonasen Sommer – Their Story via Treelines

I recently tried a new genealogy on-line software program called Treelines, which helps genealogists create visual stories to illustrate their ancestors’ lives.  My first attempt at using the software was to create the story of Nels and Ane Jonasen Sommer’s lives.

https://www.treelines.com/

Continue reading

North Molton, Devonshire, England to Devonshire Hollow, Lafayette County, Wisconsin

On the 26th of March, 1851, a group of 12 people left North Molton, Devonshire, England headed for Plymouth Harbor to take ship for North America.  The group consisted of three generations of an extended family, as well as some friends, all going to start a new life in America that they hoped would hold more opportunity than the difficult lives they led in the mines, sheep pastures and wool manufacturing factories of mid-19th century England.

Travel Route taken by the North Molton emigrants

Travel Route taken by the North Molton emigrants

Uniquely, one member of the group, John Cockings, kept a travel diary of their journey, and many letters have survived that were sent both from the migrants and those left behind.  These primary sources provide fascinating insights into the complicated decision about whether to migrate, a glimpse of what life was like for the pioneers, as well as those who remained in England, and an idea of what the physical journey of migration was like at the time.

Continue reading

Family & Will of Stephen Agard, Esq. (~1513-~1563) of Broughton, Northamptonshire (Rev 11/16)

Stephen Agard Will page 1

Stephen Agard Will page 1

 

 

 

 

 

Stephen Agard, Esq. of Broughton, Northamptonshire, was born about 1513 and died shortly before 13 Oct 1562, when he was buried in Broughton.  He was probably the second born surviving son of George Agard (~1486? – 1522) and his wife, Elizabeth Middlemore (~1487? – ?).  The family consisted of three surviving children that I know of:  eldest son John, Stephen, and, I would argue, their sister, Katherine.  As Stephen held Broughton by 1546, I am guessing that John died young without surviving heirs.

Continue reading